H. Michael Steinberg has over 32 years experience practicing Colorado criminal law. Mr. Steinberg strives to stay current with the ever changing aspects of criminal law issues and updates resulting in his extensive knowledge of successful criminal defense as well as appellate work. He is also an active member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, the Colorado Criminal Defense Bar Association, the Colorado Trial Lawyer's Association, and the Colorado and Arapahoe Bar Associations.

Articles Posted in Criminal Process

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Colorado Criminal Law - Tricks Police Use To Get Your Statement - The Interview Room.jpgBy H. Michael Steinberg Colorado Criminal Defense Lawyer

Colorado Criminal Law – Tricks Police Use To Get You To Confess – The Interview Room Even the interview room itself is designed to play a role in wearing down the target, whether that target is the suspect, a witness, or even possibly the alleged victim of a crime.

Designing The Interview Room – Where The Interrogation Takes Place

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Confidentiality Of Lawyer -Colorado Attorney Client Communications - Is It Safe To Talk To Your Lawyer From Jail.jpgBy H. Michael Steinberg – Colorado Criminal Defense Lawyer

Confidentiality Of Lawyer – Client Communications – Is It Safe To Talk To Your Lawyer From Jail? – The sanctity of lawyer client communication is one of the most fundamental of all rights accorded under Colorado criminal law.

The confidentiality of your conversations with your lawyer, doctor or spiritual advisor are among the oldest privileges accorded by our legal system.

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goingtojailBy H. Michael Steinberg – Colorado Criminal Defense Lawyer – Attorney – Email

How Do Colorado Police Officers “Clear” A Criminal Investigation? – Many alleged victims of crime file charges with the various Colorado police departments – then they wait.

The following information explains how the police terminate or “complete” those investigations.

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Colorado Violation Of Bail Bond Conditions 18-8-212
On May 28, 2013 – the governor of the state of Colorado John Hickenlooper signed HB 13-1242 which impacted Colorado Revised Statute 18-8-212. The latter law governs so called “technical” Bail Bond violations.

The change was called “Concerning a Repeal of the Mandatory Sentencing Requirement for Violation of Bail Bond Conditions for Certain Offenders.”

What does the law do?

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Colorado Miranda Rights.pngOn June 17, 2013 the United States Supreme Court – in Salinas v. Texas – took a step back from the protections accorded by the Fifth Amendment’s Right To Remain Silent.

The Facts of Salinas:

Salinas – before being placed into custody – answered questions posed by a police officer in a homicide investigation. At the time he answered the questions he was not under arrest. Among the questions was a comment by the officer about the potential ballistics match as regards casings found at the scene.

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Colorado Mirand Rights Law.jpgBy Colorado Criminal Defense Lawyer – Attorney – Colorado Miranda Rights Law – H. Michael Steinberg

Colorado Miranda Rights Law is sometimes not only internally complex but is ever evolving for law enforcement since the original Miranda decision so many years ago.

Understanding the application of the Miranda decision – the imposition of the advisement and issues surrounding the waiver of your Miranda rights requires a close look at the law and what constitutes a valid waiver of those rights.

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The Duty to Due Justice

What every criminal lawyer knows – defense or prosecutor – is simple. Within the criminal justice system, the prosecutor (DA), not the judge – not the jury – and certainly not the criminal defense lawyer – has the most power.

In other forms of our government – there is a balance of power – checks and balances are written into both the State of Colorado and United States Constitutions by our forefathers. Not so in the criminal justice system. That system was taken almost wholesale from British Empire.

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Colorado detective charged with perjury

DENVER — Fort Collins Police Lt. James Broderick, the lead detective in the Tim Masters murder investigation, was on Wednesday indicted by the Larimer County Grand Jury on eight counts of first-degree perjury, The Denver Post reports.

Broderick is accused of concealing evidence that would have helped Masters at his 1998 trial, at which he was found guilty of the 1987 murder of Peggy Hettrick. The conviction was overturned in 2008 when DNA evidence pointed to other suspects.